mortisia:


Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera (/kaɪˈrɒptərə/; from the Greek χείρ - cheir, “hand” and πτερόν - pteron, “wing”) whose forelimbs form webbed wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. By contrast, other mammals said to fly, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums, and colugos, can only glide for short distances. Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs, as birds do, but instead flap their spread-out digits, which are very long and covered with a thin membrane or patagium. Bats are the second largest order of mammals (after the rodents), representing about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with about 1,240 bat species divided into two suborders: the less specialized and largely fruit-eating megabats, or flying foxes, and the highly specialized and echolocating microbats. About 70% of bat species are insectivores. Most of the rest are frugivores, or fruit eaters. A few species, such as the fish-eating bat, feed from animals other than insects, with the vampire bats being hematophagous, or feeding on blood.
Bats are present throughout most of the world, performing vital ecological roles of pollinating flowers and dispersing fruit seeds. Many tropical plant species depend entirely on bats for the distribution of their seeds. Bats are important, as they consume insect pests, reducing the need for pesticides. The smallest bat is the Kitti’s hog-nosed bat, measuring 29–34 mm (1.14–1.34 in) in length, 15 cm (5.91 in) across the wings and 2–2.6 g (0.07–0.09 oz) in mass. It is also arguably the smallest extant species of mammal, with the Etruscan shrew being the other contender. The largest species of bat are a few species of Pteropus and the giant golden-crowned flying fox with a weight up to 1.6 kg (4 lb) and wingspan up to 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in). Source | Edit

"For as the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all."- Aristotle 

mortisia:


Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera (/kaɪˈrɒptərə/; from the Greek χείρ - cheir, “hand” and πτερόν - pteron, “wing”) whose forelimbs form webbed wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. By contrast, other mammals said to fly, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums, and colugos, can only glide for short distances. Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs, as birds do, but instead flap their spread-out digits, which are very long and covered with a thin membrane or patagium. Bats are the second largest order of mammals (after the rodents), representing about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with about 1,240 bat species divided into two suborders: the less specialized and largely fruit-eating megabats, or flying foxes, and the highly specialized and echolocating microbats. About 70% of bat species are insectivores. Most of the rest are frugivores, or fruit eaters. A few species, such as the fish-eating bat, feed from animals other than insects, with the vampire bats being hematophagous, or feeding on blood.
Bats are present throughout most of the world, performing vital ecological roles of pollinating flowers and dispersing fruit seeds. Many tropical plant species depend entirely on bats for the distribution of their seeds. Bats are important, as they consume insect pests, reducing the need for pesticides. The smallest bat is the Kitti’s hog-nosed bat, measuring 29–34 mm (1.14–1.34 in) in length, 15 cm (5.91 in) across the wings and 2–2.6 g (0.07–0.09 oz) in mass. It is also arguably the smallest extant species of mammal, with the Etruscan shrew being the other contender. The largest species of bat are a few species of Pteropus and the giant golden-crowned flying fox with a weight up to 1.6 kg (4 lb) and wingspan up to 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in). Source | Edit

"For as the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all."- Aristotle 

mortisia:


Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera (/kaɪˈrɒptərə/; from the Greek χείρ - cheir, “hand” and πτερόν - pteron, “wing”) whose forelimbs form webbed wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. By contrast, other mammals said to fly, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums, and colugos, can only glide for short distances. Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs, as birds do, but instead flap their spread-out digits, which are very long and covered with a thin membrane or patagium. Bats are the second largest order of mammals (after the rodents), representing about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with about 1,240 bat species divided into two suborders: the less specialized and largely fruit-eating megabats, or flying foxes, and the highly specialized and echolocating microbats. About 70% of bat species are insectivores. Most of the rest are frugivores, or fruit eaters. A few species, such as the fish-eating bat, feed from animals other than insects, with the vampire bats being hematophagous, or feeding on blood.
Bats are present throughout most of the world, performing vital ecological roles of pollinating flowers and dispersing fruit seeds. Many tropical plant species depend entirely on bats for the distribution of their seeds. Bats are important, as they consume insect pests, reducing the need for pesticides. The smallest bat is the Kitti’s hog-nosed bat, measuring 29–34 mm (1.14–1.34 in) in length, 15 cm (5.91 in) across the wings and 2–2.6 g (0.07–0.09 oz) in mass. It is also arguably the smallest extant species of mammal, with the Etruscan shrew being the other contender. The largest species of bat are a few species of Pteropus and the giant golden-crowned flying fox with a weight up to 1.6 kg (4 lb) and wingspan up to 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in). Source | Edit

"For as the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all."- Aristotle 

mortisia:


Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera (/kaɪˈrɒptərə/; from the Greek χείρ - cheir, “hand” and πτερόν - pteron, “wing”) whose forelimbs form webbed wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. By contrast, other mammals said to fly, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums, and colugos, can only glide for short distances. Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs, as birds do, but instead flap their spread-out digits, which are very long and covered with a thin membrane or patagium. Bats are the second largest order of mammals (after the rodents), representing about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with about 1,240 bat species divided into two suborders: the less specialized and largely fruit-eating megabats, or flying foxes, and the highly specialized and echolocating microbats. About 70% of bat species are insectivores. Most of the rest are frugivores, or fruit eaters. A few species, such as the fish-eating bat, feed from animals other than insects, with the vampire bats being hematophagous, or feeding on blood.
Bats are present throughout most of the world, performing vital ecological roles of pollinating flowers and dispersing fruit seeds. Many tropical plant species depend entirely on bats for the distribution of their seeds. Bats are important, as they consume insect pests, reducing the need for pesticides. The smallest bat is the Kitti’s hog-nosed bat, measuring 29–34 mm (1.14–1.34 in) in length, 15 cm (5.91 in) across the wings and 2–2.6 g (0.07–0.09 oz) in mass. It is also arguably the smallest extant species of mammal, with the Etruscan shrew being the other contender. The largest species of bat are a few species of Pteropus and the giant golden-crowned flying fox with a weight up to 1.6 kg (4 lb) and wingspan up to 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in). Source | Edit

"For as the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all."- Aristotle 

mortisia:

Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera (/kaɪˈrɒptərə/; from the Greek χείρ - cheir, “hand” and πτερόν - pteron, “wing”) whose forelimbs form webbed wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. By contrast, other mammals said to fly, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums, and colugos, can only glide for short distances. Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs, as birds do, but instead flap their spread-out digits, which are very long and covered with a thin membrane or patagium. Bats are the second largest order of mammals (after the rodents), representing about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with about 1,240 bat species divided into two suborders: the less specialized and largely fruit-eating megabats, or flying foxes, and the highly specialized and echolocating microbats. About 70% of bat species are insectivores. Most of the rest are frugivores, or fruit eaters. A few species, such as the fish-eating bat, feed from animals other than insects, with the vampire bats being hematophagous, or feeding on blood.

Bats are present throughout most of the world, performing vital ecological roles of pollinating flowers and dispersing fruit seeds. Many tropical plant species depend entirely on bats for the distribution of their seeds. Bats are important, as they consume insect pests, reducing the need for pesticides. The smallest bat is the Kitti’s hog-nosed bat, measuring 29–34 mm (1.14–1.34 in) in length, 15 cm (5.91 in) across the wings and 2–2.6 g (0.07–0.09 oz) in mass. It is also arguably the smallest extant species of mammal, with the Etruscan shrew being the other contender. The largest species of bat are a few species of Pteropus and the giant golden-crowned flying fox with a weight up to 1.6 kg (4 lb) and wingspan up to 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in). Source | Edit

"For as the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all."- Aristotle 

penthesileas:


AND FIERCE IMPATIENT ENDS / an instrumental mix of music, inspired by the general atmosphere of a bronte novel (requested by hallsofvalhalla)

01. String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor (“Death and the Maiden”): I. Allegro - Franz Schubert02. Préludes op.28, N°24 en ré mineur - Frédéric Chopin03. In Principio - Ludovico Einaudi04. Canon per Augmentationem in Contrario Motu - J. S. Bach05. Suspicion - Javier Navarrete06. Violin Concerto in A Minor (“L’Estro Armonico #6”): II. Largo - Antonio Vivaldi07. Hoarfrost - Danny Norbury 08. End Titles - Angelo Badalamenti09. Les Érinnyes: Élégie for Cello - Jules Massenet10. The Half Killed - Dario Marianelli11. Found Song for P. - Max Richter


LISTEN or KEEP

penthesileas:

AND FIERCE IMPATIENT ENDS / an instrumental mix of music, inspired by the general atmosphere of a bronte novel (requested by hallsofvalhalla)

01. String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor (“Death and the Maiden”): I. Allegro - Franz Schubert
02. Préludes op.28, N°24 en ré mineur - Frédéric Chopin
03. In Principio - Ludovico Einaudi
04. Canon per Augmentationem in Contrario Motu - J. S. Bach
05. Suspicion - Javier Navarrete
06. Violin Concerto in A Minor (“L’Estro Armonico #6”): II. Largo - Antonio Vivaldi
07. Hoarfrost - Danny Norbury 
08. End Titles - Angelo Badalamenti
09. Les Érinnyes: Élégie for Cello - Jules Massenet
10. The Half Killed - Dario Marianelli
11. Found Song for P. - Max Richter

LISTEN or KEEP

theticklishpear:

This list is meant as an information resource for creative folk, not a complete guide. Be sure to supplement this with additional research. Find the rest of the series, including the previous posts on clergynobilitydivinationspirit animalsmedieval punishments, and common terms of medieval life.

The following list of creatures is definitely not complete, I will admit that upfront. However, the it is quite extensive and spans the globe. I apologize in advance if I miss your favorite mythical creature. Because of the mythic, folk-lore origins of many of these creatures, accounts vary widely from region to region, and even within the same region tales may differ. Due to the difficulty in lining up and definitively giving a description, please allow leeway on these.

Banshee: In Irish legend, the banshee is a female spirit that voices her strange wail when death is imminent. Banshees are usually attached to a specific family and wail when a member of that family is near death. Banshees have streaming hair and red eyes from weeping. Some accounts only give them one nostril. In Scottish legend, the equivalent is the Little Washer of Sorrow. In this case, the female spirit appears at the side of a stream washing the clothes of the soon to be departed.

Bunyips: Making its home in the waterways of Australia, the bunyips are often described as having a crocodile’s tail with the rest of its body resembling either a bandicoot, an emu, or a man. They can have manes or heads covered with weeds, and their feet are turned backwards. One constant in tales of bunyips is the fact that the bunyip’s cry can be heard as a terrifying booing noise coming from the swamps. Bunyips devour people, preferring women and children.

Read More

inchells:

Flower beard Nori ! 

shadyoaks:


Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)
engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

DAMMITSO MANY BOB FEEEELLLLSS

shadyoaks:

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)

engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

DAMMIT

SO MANY BOB FEEEELLLLSS

(Source: paintingses)

annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).
annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).
annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).
annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).
annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).
annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).
annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).
annatars:



The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns

My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).

annatars:

The Hobbit: dwarvish patterns


My first attempt at creating a photoset. I love all the geometric patterns present in dwarvish clothing (and architecture but ugh one thing at a time).

victoriousvocabulary:

JOCUND
[adjective]
cheerful; merry; gay; blithe; glad.
Etymology: from Middle English jocound < Late Latin jocundus, alteration of Latin jūcundus, “pleasant”, equivalent to ju(vāre), “to help, benefit, please, delight”.
[Victor Vercesi]

victoriousvocabulary:

JOCUND

[adjective]

cheerful; merry; gay; blithe; glad.

Etymology: from Middle English jocound < Late Latin jocundus, alteration of Latin jūcundus, “pleasant”, equivalent to ju(vāre), “to help, benefit, please, delight”.

[Victor Vercesi]

riddlesolved:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

I find offering someonecwater is s good thing to do when not helping with breathing and listening to wgat they say. Water helps by cooling, distracting, and having some simple task to perform.

If i start panicking, water is my universal solution to everything.

Also, by all means make unnecessary people go away. People having an attack do not want a big audience. One person is often more than enough.

groovy-tiger:

Thrandy Seasons

nudiemuse:

feathersandbeaks:

"Cognitive biologists have revealed that ravens do understand and keep track of the rank relations between other ravens. Such an ability has been known only from primates. Like many social mammals, ravens form different types of social relationships — they may be friends, kin, or partners and they also form strict dominance relations. From a cognitive perspective, understanding one’s own relationships to others is a key ability in daily social life ("knowing who is nice or not"). Yet, also understanding the relationships group members have with each other sets the stage for "political" maneuvers ("knowing who might support whom"). "

(via Political ravens? Ravens notice the relationships among others, study shows — ScienceDaily)

REALLY interesting research on the social behavior of ravens.

Scary birb. Interesting birb.

tosquinha:

Music of the Ainur - also known as Melkor what are you doing stop it NO!

This choir from right to left: Vána, Oromë, Tulkas, Nessa, Estë, Irmo, Vairë, Námo, Nienna, Ulmo, Aulë, Yavanna, Manwë, Varda and Melkor. tosquinha:

Music of the Ainur - also known as Melkor what are you doing stop it NO!

This choir from right to left: Vána, Oromë, Tulkas, Nessa, Estë, Irmo, Vairë, Námo, Nienna, Ulmo, Aulë, Yavanna, Manwë, Varda and Melkor. tosquinha:

Music of the Ainur - also known as Melkor what are you doing stop it NO!

This choir from right to left: Vána, Oromë, Tulkas, Nessa, Estë, Irmo, Vairë, Námo, Nienna, Ulmo, Aulë, Yavanna, Manwë, Varda and Melkor.

tosquinha:

Music of the Ainur - also known as Melkor what are you doing stop it NO!

This choir from right to left: Vána, Oromë, Tulkas, Nessa, Estë, Irmo, Vairë, Námo, Nienna, Ulmo, Aulë, Yavanna, Manwë, Varda and Melkor.

beguilingblackness:

beguilingblackness:

I wanted to talk about this passage

Then Ilúvatar arose, and the Ainur perceived that he smiled; and he lifted up his left hand, and a new theme began amid the storm, like and yet unlike to the former theme, and it gathered power and had new beauty.

Read More

I was at least partially right. Here is a quote regarding Melkor from Chapter 7:

Little he knew yet concerning Men, for engrossed with his own thought in the Music he had paid small heed to the Third Theme of Ilúvatar

So apparently the Third Theme does indeed concern Men: the good (the music of Ilúvatar)in them seems weak and outweighed by great evil (the louder, more violent discord of Melkor), but ultimately it is unrelenting and unyielding in the face of darkness. So I suppose the other two Themes map out to the Ainur and Elves.